Freelancers handed fixed-pricing guide

A guide to help freelancers survive and then thrive in the uncertain world of fixed-price projects has been excerpted from a new e-book for the self-employed.

Composed by web designer, developer and directory founder Daniel Howells, the approximately 1400-word guide for the book by FreeAgent starts with an admission.

“You’re likely to hear warnings against charging one total cost for a job, [known as a] fixed-price project. Yet…after almost a decade of freelancing, the majority of projects I undertake are still quoted on a fixed-price basis.”

And so begins Howell’s pragmatic approach, whereby he weighs up the theoretical pros and cons of fixed pricing, albeit through the lens of his own valuable experiences as a creative freelancer.

He goes onto explain that while fixed pricing can, at its worst, see freelancers work for free for “weeks” - even “months,” such ‘price-guaranteed’ projects are easier to sell to prospective clients, and bring them less risk.

The importance to freelancers of tracking the time that a project is going to require; how to go about tracking before you quote a fixed-price and how to refine your tracking process are then spelt out by Howells in clear terms.

His top three lessons follow – among them, and crucial for emerging with an accurate estimate of a project’s required hours – ‘My design time varies much more than development time.’

The guide has been published as a preview chapter to A Field Guide to Freelancer Finances, produced by FreeAgent as an e-book but due to be available in hardback later this month.

Editor’s Note: Related Reading –

Freelancers’ Questions: Is an estimate the same as a quote?

Getting paid a fair whack when you didn’t fix a price

Freelancers ask: how much should I charge?

 

3rd February 2016

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